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    Northeast Texas Community College
   
 
  Jul 26, 2017
 
 
    
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2012-2013 Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Instructional Program Information



Instructional Program Information

Northeast Texas Community College’s primary purpose is to meet the variety of educational needs of individuals within its service area. The College provides the freshman and sophomore years of traditional baccalaureate programs; it trains technicians for business and industry; it supplies background courses essential to up-grading one’s job; and it enables people to pursue leisure and avocational interests through planned activities. Courses are offered in the day and evening during the academic year, during winter mini-mester, intersession, and in the summer. Students may enroll for part or full-time study.

 

Core Curriculum Philosophy

The philosophy of the core curriculum at NTCC is based on the development of students so they are prepared for successful careers, for successful transfer to baccalaureate programs, and for effective functioning as citizens and as members of families, groups, and organizations. Students need effective oral and written communication skills. They need computational and reasoning skills which result from the study of mathematics and computer science. Effective citizenship is based on a variety of skills and knowledge. However, an understanding of our nation’s history and the political process are certainly keys to effective participation in the formation and implementation of public policy at all levels. Critical thinking and decision-making skills are essential for students to perform effectively at all levels within organizations. The expression of ideas and values through visual and performing arts and other humanities is an integral part of student development. Especially in the technological and fast-paced environment of the modern workplace it is important for students to understand and appreciate the various expressions of ideas, values, emotions, joy, and suffering throughout history as manifested in the arts and other cultures. The integration of physical, mental, and emotional wellness is an important aspect of student development. More important than the accumulation of a set body of knowledge is the student’s ability to conduct research and acquire new knowledge through self-learning. Consequently, the research skills acquired through the physical, biological, and social sciences, along with English and communications, are essential for the development of a society of life-long learners.

 

Educational Objectives

The educational objectives of the NTCC core curriculum include the exemplary educational objectives proposed by the Advisory Committee on Core Curriculum and approved by the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board in 1998.

These educational objectives are as follows:

1. Communication (composition, speech, modern language)
The objective of a communication component of a core curriculum is to enable the student to communicate effectively in clear and correct prose in a style appropriate to the subject, occasion, and audience.

Exemplary Educational Objectives

  1. to understand and demonstrate writing and speaking processes through invention, organization, drafting, revision, editing, and presentation;
  2. to understand the importance of specifying audience and purpose and to select appropriate communication choices;
  3. to understand and appropriately apply modes of expression, i.e., descriptive, expositive, narrative, scientific, and self-expressive, in written, visual, and oral communication;
  4. to participate effectively in groups with emphasis on listening, critical and reflective thinking, and responding;
  5. to understand and apply basic principles of critical thinking, problem solving, and technical proficiency in the development of exposition and argument;
  6. to develop the ability to research and write a documented paper and/or to give an oral presentation.

2. Mathematics
The objective of the mathematics component of the core curriculum is to develop a quantitatively literate college graduate. Every college graduate should be able to apply basic mathematical tools in the solution of real-world problems.

Exemplary Educational Objectives

  1. to apply arithmetic, algebraic, geometric, higher order thinking, and statistical methods to modeling and solving real-world situations;
  2. to represent and evaluate basic mathematical information verbally, numerically, graphically, and symbolically;
  3. to expand mathematical reasoning skills and formal logic to develop convincing mathematical arguments;
  4. to use appropriate technology to enhance mathematical thinking and understanding and to solve mathematical problems and judge the reasonableness of the results;
  5. to interpret mathematical models such as formulas, graphs, tables and schematics, and draw inferences from them;
  6. to recognize the limitations of mathematical and statistical models;
  7. to develop the view that mathematics is an evolving discipline, interrelated with human culture, and understand its connections to other disciplines.

3. Natural Sciences
The objective of the study of a natural sciences component of a core curriculum is to enable the student to understand, construct, and evaluate relationships in the natural sciences, and to enable the student to understand the bases for building and testing theories.

Exemplary Educational Objectives

  1. to understand and apply method and appropriate technology to the study of natural sciences;
  2. to recognize scientific and quantitative methods and the differences between these approaches and other methods of inquiry and to communicate findings, analyses, and interpretation both orally and in writing;
  3. to identify and recognize the differences among competing scientific theories;
  4. to demonstrate knowledge of the major issues and problems facing modern science, including issues that touch upon ethics, values, and public policies;
  5. to demonstrate knowledge of the interdependence of science and techno-logy and their influence on, and contribution to, modern culture.

4. Humanities and Visual and Performing Arts
The objective of the humanities and visual and performing arts in a core curriculum is to expand students’ knowledge of the human condition and human cultures, especially in relation to behaviors, ideas, and values expressed in works of human imagination and thought. Through study in disciplines such as literature, philosophy, and the visual and performing arts, students will engage in critical analysis, form aesthetic judgments, and develop an appreciation of the arts and humanities as fundamental to the health and survival of any society. Students should have experiences in both the arts and humanities.

Exemplary Educational Objectives

  1. to demonstrate awareness of the scope and variety of works in the arts and humanities;
  2. to understand those works as expressions of individual and human values within an historical and social context;
  3. to respond critically to works in the arts and humanities;
  4. to engage in the creative process or interpretive performance and comprehend the physical and intellectual demands required of the author or visual or performing artist;
  5. to articulate an informed personal reaction to works in the arts and humanities;
  6. to develop an appreciation for the aesthetic principles that guide or govern the humanities and arts;
  7. to demonstrate knowledge of the influence of literature, philosophy, and/or the arts on intercultural experiences.

5. Social and Behavioral Sciences
The objective of a social and behavioral science component of a core curriculum is to increase students’ knowledge of how social and behavioral scientists discover, describe, and explain the behaviors and interactions among individuals, groups, institutions, events, and ideas. Such knowledge will better equip students to understand themselves and the roles they play in addressing the issues facing humanity.

Exemplary Educational Objectives

  1. to employ the appropriate methods, technologies, and data that social and behavioral scientists use to investigate the human condition;
  2. to examine social institutions and processes across a range of historical periods, social structures, and cultures;
  3. to use and critique alternative explanatory systems or theories;
  4. to develop and communicate alternative explanations or solutions for contemporary social issues;
  5. to analyze the effects of historical, social, political, economic, cultural, and global forces on the area under study;
  6. to comprehend the origins and evolution of U.S. and Texas political systems, with a focus on the growth of political institutions, the constitutions of the U.S. and Texas, federalism, civil liberties, civil and human rights;
  7. to understand the evolution and current role of the U.S. in the world;
  8. to differentiate and analyze historical evidence (documentary and statistical) and differing points of view;
  9. to recognize and apply reasonable criteria for the acceptability of historical evidence and social research;
  10. to analyze, critically assess, and develop creative solutions to public policy problems;
  11. to recognize and assume one’s responsibility as a citizen in a democratic society by learning to think for oneself, by engaging in public discourse, and by obtaining information through the news media and other appropriate information sources about politics and public policy; to identify and under-stand differences and commonalities within diverse cultures.

6. Health and Physical Education Courses
More and more people are exercising less and less. Forty to sixty percent of those who begin an activity program quit within the first six months. Therefore, the objective of the health and physical education department is to provide each student with the opportunity for lifetime wellness. An individualized approach will allow students to pursue their health, fitness and sports performance goals. Initially, each student will be assessed according to their needs and goals. Then a physical fitness program will be implemented, along with feedback and post tests to enhance their health, fitness and performance.

Exemplary Educational Objectives

  1. to demonstrate proper techniques of body conditioning;
  2. to explain the physiological basis of physical training;
  3. to explain the healthful benefits of lifetime fitness training;
  4. to develop strength, endurance and flexibility;
  5. to demonstrate the basics of physical conditioning;
  6. to acquire an appreciation of full body conditioning including cardiovascular involvement;
  7. to design a program for lifetime physical development and maintenance.

Core Curriculum Required Courses

(These courses are required of all students earning transfer degrees, both A.A., A.S., and A.A.T)

  1. Six hours in composition. (ENGL 1301  and ENGL 1302 )
  2. Three hours in speech (SPCH 1311  or SPCH 1315  or SPCH 1321 )
  3. Three to four hours in mathematics (MATH 1314 , its equivalent, or higher).
  4. Three hours in social/behavioral sciences (SOCI 1301  or PSYC 2301  or ECON 2301  or ECON 2302 , ANTH 2351  or GEOG 1303 ).
  5. Eight hours in physical and/or life sciences.
  6. Three hours in humanities (SPAN 2311  or SPAN 2312  or philosophy or literature or humanities or world civilization).
  7. Six hours in government GOVT 2305  and GOVT 2306 
  8. Six hours in United States history (HIST 1301  or HIST 1302 ).
  9. Three hours in visual and performing arts (ARTS 1301  or ARTS 1303  or ARTS 1304  or MUSI 1306  or DRAM 1310  or DRAM 2361  )
  10. Two hours in physical education (PHED 1102  PHED 1103  PHED 1104  PHED 1105  PHED 1106  PHED 1107  PHED 1108  PHED 1110  PHED 1111  PHED 1112  PHED 1114  PHED 1115  PHED 1116  PHED 1117  PHED 1119  PHED 1120  PHED 1121  PHED 1122  PHED 1124  PHED 1125  PHED 1129 , PHED 1134  PHED 1136  PHED 1137 , PHED 1138 , PHED 1146  PHED 1147  PHED 1148 , PHED 1238 )

TOTAL: 43-44 semester credit hours 

Degree Requirements

Associate Of Arts (A.A.) Degree
Associate Of Science (A.S.) Degree

The Associate of Arts and Associate of Science degrees include coursework in general academic and pre-professional education and give broad exposure to lower division baccalaureate study. These degrees enable students to enter as juniors at the four-year college/university of their choice.

While the Associate of Arts and Associate of Science degree programs will satisfy the transfer requirements of most four-year institutions, it is the student’s responsibility to determine the transfer institution’s specific requirements and plan accordingly with the assistance of an NTCC counselor.

 

Associate Of Arts Degree Requirements

  1. Core Curriculum.
  2. Three hours in literature
  3. Sixteen hours of electives primarily in a major field of study.
    TOTAL: 62 semester credit hours

Complete a minimum of eighteen total semester hours at Northeast Texas Community College.
Attain a minimum cumulative grade point average (GPA) of 2.0 for all courses counted for graduation.
Discharge all financial obligations to the College prior to graduation.

To earn both the Associate of Arts Degree and the Associate of Science Degree, the minimum requirements for each must be met, and an additional 15 college-level semester hours of transfer courses must be earned at NTCC. All residency requirements must be met.

For all students who fall under the guidelines of the Texas Success Initiative (TSI), passage of the THEA or an approved alternative test is required prior to graduation with an Associate of Arts degree. Please consult the Northeast Texas Community College Texas Success Initiative Institutional Plan for further information.

(Students may not receive the full six hours of credit for HIST 1301  and HIST 1302  by testing. Three hours of United States history must be taken in class to meet the state requirements for graduation).

 

Associate Of Science Degree Requirements

  1. Core Curriculum.
  2. Nineteen hours of electives primarily in a major field of study.
    TOTAL: 62 semester credit hours 

Complete a minimum of eighteen total semester hours at Northeast Texas Community College.
Attain a minimum cumulative grade point average (GPA) of 2.0 for all courses counted for graduation.
Discharge all financial obligations to the College prior to graduation.

To earn both the Associate of Science Degree and the Associate of Arts Degree, the minimum requirements for each must be met, and an additional 15 college-level semester hours of transfer courses must be earned at NTCC. All residence requirements must be met.

For all students who fall under the guidelines of the Texas Success Initiative (TSI), passage of the THEA or an approved alternative test is required prior to graduation with an Associate of Science degree. Please consult the Northeast Texas Community College Texas Success Initiative Institutional Plan for further information.

(Students may not receive the full six hours of credit for HIST 1301  and HIST 1302  by testing. Three hours of United States history must be taken in class to meet the state requirement for graduation). 

Associate Of Arts In Teaching (A.A.T.) Degree

The Associate of Arts in Teaching degree is a Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board-approved collegiate degree program consisting of lower-division courses intended for transfer to baccalaureate programs that lead to initial Texas teacher certification. The Associate of Arts in Teaching degree is fully transferable to any Texas public university offering baccalaureate degree programs leading to initial teacher certification.

 

Associate Of Arts In Teaching Degree Requirements

  1. Core Curriculum
  2. Three hours in literature or psychology
  3. Six hours of education field experience courses including EDUC 1301  and EDUC 2301 
  4. All required courses as specified in the degree plan
    TOTAL: 63-66 semester credit hours

Complete a minimum of eighteen total semester hours at Northeast Texas Community College.
Attain a minimum cumulative grade point average (GPA) of 2.0 for all courses counted for graduation.
Discharge all financial obligations to the College prior to graduation.

To earn both the Associate of Arts in Teaching Degree and the Associate of Arts or Associate of Science Degree, the minimum requirements for each must be met, and an additional 15 college-level semester hours of transfer courses must be earned at NTCC. All residency requirements must be met.

For all students who fall under the guidelines of the Texas Success Initiative (TSI), passage of the THEA or an approved alternative test is required prior to graduation with an Associate of Arts in Teaching degree. Please consult the Northeast Texas Community College Texas Success Initiative Institutional Plan for further information.

 

Associate Of Applied Science (A.A.S.) Degree

The Associate of Applied Science Degree includes a concentration of coursework in a specific technical or occupational field and support courses in general education.

The Associate of Applied Science Degree is awarded for successful completion of prescribed programs of study which prepare students with the knowledge and entry-level skills necessary to enter and compete in the job market. Such courses and programs of study are not intended to transfer to four-year institutions although some colleges and universities will accept all or some of the work. 

Associate Of Applied Science Degree Requirements

Complete a minimum of sixty college-level credit hours including:

  1. Three hours in English and three hours in speech.
  2. Three hours each in mathematics and computer technology.
  3. Three hours in humanities or visual and performing arts from the following: SPAN 2311  or SPAN 2312  or philosophy or literature or world civilization or HUMA 1301  or HUMA 1302  or ARTS 1301  or ARTS 1303  or ARTS 1304  or MUSI 1306  or DRAM 1310  or DRAM 2361  
  4. Three hours in the social or behavioral sciences from the following: history, government, psychology, sociology, economics, geography, or anthropology.
  5. All required courses as specified in the degree plan.

Complete a minimum of eighteen total semester hours at Northeast Texas Community College.

The student must attain a minimum of a “C” grade for all courses in the major and a cumulative minimum grade point average (GPA) of 2.0 for all courses counted toward the degree.

Discharge all financial obligations to the College prior to graduation.

For all students who fall under the guidelines of the Texas Success Initiative (TSI), passage of the THEA or an approved alternative test is required prior to graduation with an Associate of Applied Science degree. Please consult the Northeast Texas Community College Texas Success Initiative Institutional Plan for further information.

The College confers the Associate of Applied Science Degree for the following areas:

Note: The Associate of Applied Science Degrees in all Allied Health Programs have unique admission and graduation requirements.

  

Certificates Of Competency

Certificates of Competency are awarded for successful completion of prescribed programs of study which prepare students with the knowledge and skills necessary to enter a specific job market or to up-grade their skills in a particular area. Such courses or programs are not intended for transfer to four-year institutions. The student must attain a minimum of a “C” grade for all courses in the major and a cumulative minimum grade point average (GPA) of 2.0 for all courses counted toward the certificate. Students wishing to complete a certificate of competency must complete a minimum of fifteen semester hours at Northeast Texas Community College.

The College awards Certificates of Competency for the following:

 

Overview Of The Honors Program

Northeast Texas Community College offers alternate ways for students to excel and reach career goals. The Honors Program endeavors to free students from financial obligations, promote student success at the highest levels, and foster lucrative
transferability to universities of choice, including admittance into four-year honors programs.

This program features smaller classes, special amenities like laptops, field trips, and more contact time with faculty, in this case, honors professors. It includes two kinds of students. Presidential Scholars receive substantial institutional scholarships, gifts, and other grants that usually eliminate all educational costs. Honors Scholars receive lesser institutional scholarships, which in addition to other grants, however, can often cover all basic educational costs. Presidential and Honors Scholars enroll in one honors seminar (6-7 hours combining two core curriculum classes) in each of their first three semesters of matriculation at NTCC, and in special Honors Seminar, ENGL 2342.22/ENGL 2323.22 during their fourth and last semester.

An ‘h’ will appear on the transcript of any student who successfully complies with the special standards of any course offering honors credit.

 

Mission Statement Of Honors Program

The Honors Program at Northeast Texas Community College strives to provide free and exemplary education. It exists to develop original ideas and successful projects. Inclusive and supportive, the program resolves to enroll ambitious, rising, students, promote their careers, and enhance the vitality of the college and surrounding community.

 

Admission To Honors

Becoming An Honors Or Presidential Scholar

High school students who have scored a minimum of 25 on the ACT or 1740 on the SAT, or who have graduated in the top 10 percent of their high school class are eligible to apply. Dual Enrollment students or college students with more than twelve hours of credit and a 3.5 GPA or better are also welcome to apply. Aspiring scholars must also submit an application which will include a one-page essay showing how they could work successfully in the program. Applications can be acquired from and sent to the office of the Honors Director, Dr. Andrew Yox.

Enrolling In Open Honors Courses

Any student who has attained the necessary prerequisites of a given course can enroll in any course announced as “honors” unless it is reserved only for scholars in the program include honors and non-honors students. Students with a 3.0 GPA after twelve credit hours in college, or high school graduates or students with an equivalency of a B or better average in High School can also receive an honors designation if they receive a B or better on the Honors portion of the course. All students desiring honors credit must make this clear to the professor within ten calendar days after the course begins.

Honors Credit By Taking Designated Courses

In the “Designated Courses,” shown below, students with a 3.0 GPA after twelve credit hours in college, or high school graduates or students with an equivalency of a B or better average in High School may initiate an honors component, and receive honors credit. These components must be approved by the instructor of the course, the Division Director, and the Honors Director within 10 calendar days after the course has started. This honors portion will consist of at least two elements: 1) a project that goes beyond traditional expectations, and illustrates original thought. 2) “with-it-ness” in class, a continuing engagement with course material that is exemplary. To receive honors credit in a Designated Course, students must have an abstract of their project approved by the Honors Director, and must receive a B or better from their instructor in the honors portion of their course. The abstract should state a problem, an awareness of other attempts to solve it, the question or focus posed by the student, and the student’s thesis or findings.

Designated Courses

Designated Courses in the honors system are those in a given discipline with course numbers that are equal to or greater than the following: ACCT 2301 , AGMG 2380 , ANTH 2351 , ARTS 1301 ABDR 2355 , BIOL 1406 , BUSI 1301 CHEM 1405 , COMM 1307 , COSC 2320 , ITSE 2313 CSME 2410 , CSME 2514 DHYG 2160 , DRAM 1330 , ECON 2301 , EMSP 2330 , ENGL 1302 , HIST 1301 , HUMA 1301 MATH 1325 , MDCA 2460 , PLAB 1223 , MUSI 1301 POFT 2312 PHIL 1301 , PTHA 2301 , PHYS 1401 , GOVT 2305 , PSYC 2301 SOCW 2361 , SOCI 2301 , SPAN 1411 , DRAM 1330 .

Progression In Program

Honors and Presidential Scholars are expected to engage in five hours of community service each semester, and to maintain course loads as full-time students. To continue as Honors and Presidential Scholars, students must maintain a minimum cumulative grade point average (GPA) of 3.25, as well as a minimum cumulative GPA in their interdisciplinary seminars of 3.0 and in subsequent classes taken for honors credit. To graduate as a Presidential Scholar, students must have taken at least twenty-one hours of overall honors credit, and meet the requirements of an associate degree.

The Honors Program is meant to be porous. Any NTCC student with a cumulative 3.5 GPA or better can apply to enter the program before the fall or spring semesters. Any Honors Scholar can be elevated after any fall or spring semester to Presidential Scholar by completing projects that exceed expectations, and keeping up with their commitments in Honors.

 

Instructional Support Services

 

Learning Resource Center

The Learning Resource Center (LRC), conveniently located in the center of campus, provides an attractive atmosphere for study and research. Carrels, tables, and lounge furniture make for an environment conducive either to working on assignments or recreational reading. Tours of the LRC and instruction in the use of the library may be provided to groups on request; individual assistance is always available, including online tutorials for those who cannot readily visit the LRC in person.

Use of the library and its materials is extended to all members of the community. Adult residents of Camp, Morris, and Titus counties, as well as students, faculty, and staff of NTCC, may register for a library card and borrow materials. In addition, the LRC participates in the TexShare Library Card program, a reciprocal lending program that allows users to borrow materials in person at libraries across the state. Each user is responsible for materials borrowed with his or her library card.

Books, periodicals, audiovisual materials, and online databases are selected to support the curriculum and serve the needs of students and faculty. The book collection consists of over 33,000 print volumes, with an almost equal number of electronic books available through the library’s subscription to NetLibrary. Over 300 periodicals and newspapers are received in print and microfiche, and many thousands more are available online through database subscriptions. The LRC maintains a website with links to its online catalog and other Internet resources, as well as information about library and media services. Audiovisual equipment is available for use in individual carrels for those wishing to use audiotapes, videocassettes, and DVDs.

Public computers provide access to the Internet, online databases, and instructional and productivity software. Wireless Internet access is available campus wide for those with their own notebook computers and wireless network devices; prior registration with Computer Services is required. Photocopying of print materials is available at a nominal cost; photocopying of microform materials is possible but limited.

 

Continuing Education and Corporate Training

Continuing Education and Corporate Training at Northeast Texas Community College is committed to providing opportunities to all who are motivated to learn and enrich their lives. Non-credit courses, seminars, workshops, and conferences are offered on current topics in a wide variety of areas, such as banking, management and business related courses, computers, food safety, as well as food protection management certification. Students can explore the latest developments in their occupational fields, meet continuing education requirements for job re-certification, and train for new and emerging careers or enrolling in the night Police Academy. In addition, human interest and leisure learning programs in the arts, recreation, gardening, and family, money management, dancing, and personal development courses help people of all ages improve their quality of life. Finally, corporate training classes can be customized for business, industry, and area organizations to meet the ever-changing needs and requirements. These classes can be offered on campus, on-site, at the Naples Center in Naples, or at the Hanson-Sewell Center in Pittsburg, as well as other sites provided by the community. Programs for youth ages 6 and up are available throughout the year, and during the summer, Kids Camp is held annually. In cooperation with local workforce development boards, the Continuing Education program targets specific demand occupations for intensive training and retraining. Tuition and fees may be defrayed through the Workforce Investment Act (WIA) with approval of the local boards for students who qualify. Other grant aid is limited but may be available to qualified students who apply at least six weeks in advance of a workforce-related training program. Students may enroll in a credit course for no credit through Continuing Education on a space available basis with instructor permission. Tuition and fees will be assessed at the same rate as a credit course. For more information, please call 903-434- 8134.

 

Professional Education and Allied Health

The Professional Education and Allied Health Training Department is responsible for the development, coordination, and management of a variety of noncredit continuing professional education programs and courses for licensure and/or certification for individual students. This area consists of Nurse Aide, Medication Aide, Phlebotomy, Emergency Medical Services, Fire Academy, Rural Health, and other program areas as well as various state and local agencies, community services, and health-care providers that provide quality pre-service training and staff development. For more information, please call 903-434-8288.

 

Distance Education

NTCC offers courses that students can take over the Internet. Most academic departments on the NTCC campus offer courses online, and the Virtual College of Texas offers an extensive range of courses in which students can enroll through NTCC. Texas A&M University - Texarkana offers several ITV classes on the NTCC campus through a partnership agreement with the college. The mission of Distance Education at NTCC is to provide enhanced educational opportunities for students through advanced technology. Distance Education classes enable students to access courses that have already filled in the traditional classroom, and to pursue educational goals while balancing work and family.

 

The Virtual College of Texas

Northeast Texas Community College is a consortium member of the Virtual College of Texas. The mission of the Virtual College of Texas is to provide all Texans access via instructional technologies to quality instruction and support wherever they may live, regardless of geographic, distance, or time constraints. The Virtual College of Texas is a consortium of accredited, public Texas community and technical colleges. It includes 53 community college districts and the four colleges of the Texas State Technical College System. Through the Virtual College of Texas, students may access college courses offered at institutions across the state. However, students enroll in Virtual College of Texas classes through their local community college. They receive advisement, testing, and other student services on their local campus as well. Students interested in learning more about the Virtual College of Texas may contact NTCC’s VCT office at 903-434-8243.

 

Cooperative Education Program

Cooperative Education integrates on-campus classroom study with off-campus work experience for students in career-oriented disciplines. Northeast Texas Community College Work Experience Program provides students with supervised practical experience relating to their field of study while they concurrently obtain college course credit.

Students learn and participate in functions performed in their chosen fields so that they might determine if their selected profession or occupation is compatible with their goals. The availability of this program at the community college level affords the student this experience at a much earlier time in their educational process.

 

Developmental Education

Developmental education courses are offered in reading, writing, and math. These courses help students be successful in their college-level courses. Courses beginning with a sequence of 0 (0301) are considered to be developmental in nature. Credit for these courses is not used for college-level academic honor, graduation, or transfer. Students who are not Texas Success Initiative (TSI) complete are required to enroll in developmental education courses based on placement scores from the ACCUPLACER or THEA test.